Reason, Race and the 'Human Project'

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Reason, Race and the 'Human Project'

February 10 at 4pm in HUM 490

Poster with DaVinci's Vitruvian Man -- a line drawing of long haired man with arms and legs rendered twice each -- and the details of Michael Monahan's talk which are present in main text of the webpage.
Dr. Monahan will also be meeting with the Socratic Society at 12pm in Humanities 490

UMD Philosophy has schedule it's first colloquium of 2017 on Friday, February 10 at 4pm in Humanities 490.  We are lucky enough to have Michael Monahan here from Marquette University. He will be presenting his paper "Reason, Race and the 'Human Project'". We are also lucky enough to have Dr. Monahan meeting with the Socratic Society at 12pm also in Humanities 490.
Below is an abstract for his talk:

"One recurring theme in philosophical work from and on the Americas has to do with the relationship between European Modernity and Colonialism. Jamaican theorist Sylvia Wynter’s penetrating analysis of this relationship offers a description of what she refers to as “European Man,” in which particular European (patriarchal, bourgeois, and white) accounts of “the human”, and especially of the human as rational, posit themselves as universal. What is significant about her critique of this view, is that she does not simply abandon notions of universality, or even humanism, but rather directs her work toward a call to theoretical action in the form of “the Human project,” in which the failures of the European Enlightenment project are avoided in favor of a more genuinely universal and liberatory account of the human. This talk stands as an effort to take up the challenge posed by Wynter’s analysis, focusing in particular on the ways in which a particular understanding of reason informed European Man as an ideal, and suggesting what understanding of reason would be most appropriate to Wynter’s liberatory humanism.

Poster with DaVinci's Vitruvian Man -- a line drawing of long haired man with arms and legs rendered twice each -- and the details of Michael Monahan's talk which are present in main text of the webpage.