Anthropology, Sociology & Criminology

The Department of Anthropology, Sociology & Criminology offers majors in Anthropology, Criminology, Sociology, and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, and offers minors in Anthropology, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Studies, Sociology, and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. Unifying themes in our program include inequality, identity, power, social change and development, and global multiculturalism. The department's programs are intellectually exciting and socially relevant. Students in these programs are provided civic engagement and service learning opportunities.

Welcome to our New Faculty: E Ornelas and Jason Torkelson

E Ornelas
E Ornelas

E Ornelas (no pronouns or they/them) will be joining the Department of Anthropology, Sociology & Criminology for the 20-21 academic year as a Diversity Predoctoral Teaching Fellow. E received a bachelor of Arts in Women's Studies from Portland State University and a Master of Arts in Gender & Women's Studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Their previous Master's thesis research focused on feminist pedagogies because E is dedicated to facilitating classes related to the experiences of women, queer & trans folks, people of color, and other marginalized communities. E is currently working towards a PhD in Feminist Studies at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where E studies community-based responses to gendered, racialized, and colonial violence that Black and Indigenous fiction authors write about. When not on campus, E can be found reading feminist sci-fi, making music, and walking their dog.

Jason Torkelson
Jason Torkelson

Jason Torkelson is a Fargo native who received his Bachelor’s from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and his PhD from Rutgers University. He is absolutely thrilled to be back home in the Midwest and at UMD!

Jason’s research has touched upon topics that pertain to identity, subculture, youth, deviance, the life course, adult transition, contemporary global culture, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, and race, among other things. In his dissertation he explored “ex-identity” and transitions from youth subcultures. In some of his current research he is investigating the ways folks from 1960’s countercultures now reflect upon their involvements from the 60’s, their lives since, and their look ahead to older age. In another project he is looking into racial ideologies and conceptions of civic inclusion held by different categories of whites in contemporary America. In his free time Jason enjoys playing music, golfing, curling, hiking, and road trips.